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AuthorEltai, Nahla Omer
AuthorYassine, Hadi M.
AuthorAl-Hadidi, Sara H.
AuthorElObied, Tahra
AuthorAl Thani, Asmaa A.
AuthorAlali, Walid Q.
Available date2020-10-26T08:49:52Z
Publication Date2020
Publication NameQatar University Annual Research an Exhibition 2020 (quarfe)
CitationEltai N.O., Yassine H.M., AlHadidi S.H., ElObied T., AlThani A.A., Alali W.Q., "Retail Chicken Carcasses as a Reservoir of Antimicrobial- Resistant Escherichia coli", Qatar University Annual Research Forum and Exhibition (QUARFE 2020), Doha, 2020, https://doi.org/10.29117/quarfe.2020.0115
URIhttps://doi.org/10.29117/quarfe.2020.0115
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10576/16699
AbstractBackground: The dissemination of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) bacteria has been associated with the inappropriate use of antibiotics in both humans and animals and with the consumption of food contaminated with resistant bacteria. In particular, the use of antibiotics as prophylactic and growth promotion purposes in food-producing animals has rendered many of the antibiotics ineffective. The increased global prevalence of AMR poses a significant threat to the safety of the world's food supply. Objectives: This study aims at determining the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolated from local and imported retail chicken meat in Qatar. Methodology: A total of 270 whole chicken carcasses were obtained from three different hypermarket stores in Qatar. A total of 216 E. coli were isolated and subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing against 18 relevant antibiotics using disc diffusion and micro- dilution methods. Furthermore, extended-spectrum -lactamase (ESBL) production was determined via a double-disc synergetic test. Isolates harboring colistin resistance were confirmed using multiplex-PCR and DNA sequencing. Results: Nearly 89% (192/216) of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotics. In general, isolates showed relatively higher resistance to sulfamethoxazole (62%), tetracycline (59.7%), ampicillin and trimethoprim (52.3%), ciprofloxacin (47.7%), cephalothin, and colistin (31.9%). On the other hand, less resistance was recorded against amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (6%), ceftriaxone (5.1%), nitrofurantoin (4.2%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (4.2%), cefepime (2.3%), meropenem (1.4%), ertapenem (0.9%), and amikacin (0.9%). Nine isolates (4.2%) were ESBL producers. Furthermore, 63.4% were multidrug-resistant (MDR). The percentage of MDR, ESBL producers, and colistin-resistant isolates was significantly higher among local isolates compared to imported chicken samples. Conclusions: We reported a remarkably high percentage of the antibiotic-resistant E. coli in chicken meat sold at retail in Qatar. The high percentage of MDR and colistin isolates is troublesome to the food safety of raw chicken meat and the potential of antibiotic resistance spread to public health. Our findings support the need for the implementation of one health approach to address the spread of antimicrobial resistance and the need for a collaborative solution.
Languageen
PublisherQatar University Press
SubjectChicken carcasses
SubjectAntibiotic resistance
SubjectE. Coli
TitleRetail Chicken Carcasses as a Reservoir of Antimicrobial- Resistant Escherichia coli
TypePoster


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