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AuthorGengler, Justin
Available date2021-05-23T05:10:04Z
Publication Date2020-01-02
Publication NameReview of Faith and International Affairs
Identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15570274.2020.1729526
CitationJustin Gengler (2020) Sectarianism from the Top Down or Bottom Up? Explaining the Middle East’s Unlikely De-sectarianization after the Arab Spring, The Review of Faith & International Affairs, 18:1, 109-113, DOI: 10.1080/15570274.2020.1729526
ISSN15570274
URIhttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85081738889&origin=inward
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10576/18443
AbstractSectarian politics has retreated across the Middle East in the years after the Arab Spring, even as conflict between the region’s two main sectarian actors—Iran and Saudi Arabia—has intensified. This essay explores this incongruence as a way of better understanding the nature and drivers of sectarianism and de-sectarianization in MENA states, supported by public opinion and other data that substantiate the post-2011 decline in Arabs’ concern over sectarianism. It contends that the close correspondence between the rise and demise of the Arab Spring on the one hand, and that of sectarianism on the other, supports an instrumentalist interpretation of sectarian politics in the region.
Languageen
PublisherTaylor and Francis
SubjectArab Spring
Subjectde-sectarianization
SubjectMiddle East
Subjectpublic opinion
SubjectSectarianism
TitleSectarianism from the Top Down or Bottom Up? Explaining the Middle East’s Unlikely De-sectarianization after the Arab Spring
TypeArticle
Pagination109-113
Issue Number1
Volume Number18
ESSN1931-7743


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