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AuthorWilbur, Kerry
AuthorAl-Okka, Maha
AuthorJumaat, Ebaa
AuthorEissa, Nesma
AuthorElbashir, Merwa
AuthorAl Saadi Al-Yafei, Sumaya M.
Available date2016-10-20T10:24:12Z
Publication Date2016-04-22
Publication NamePatient Preference and Adherenceen_US
Identifierhttps://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S99718
CitationWilbur K, Al-Okka M, Jumaat E, Eissa N, Elbashir M, Al-Yafei SM "Medication risk communication with cancer patients in a Middle East cancer care setting" Patient Preference and Adherence 2016:10 613–619
ISSN1177-889X
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10576/4909
AbstractPurpose: Cancer treatments are frequently associated with adverse effects, but there may be a cultural reluctance by care providers to be forthcoming with patients regarding these risks for fear of promoting nonadherence. Conversely, research in a number of countries indicates high levels of patient desire for this information. We sought to explore cancer patient experiences, satisfaction, and preferences for medication risk communication in a Middle East care setting. Methods: We developed and administered a ten-item questionnaire (Arabic and English) to a convenience sample of consenting adult patients receiving treatment at the National Center for Cancer Care and Research in Qatar. Results: One hundred and forty-three patients were interviewed. Most (88%) stated that the level of side effect information they received was sufficient, with physicians (86%) followed by pharmacists (39%) as the preferred sources. The majority (97%) agreed that knowing about possible side effects would help them recognize and manage the reaction, and 92% agreed that it would help them understand how to minimize or prevent the risks. Eighteen percent indicated that this information would make them not want to take treatment. Two-thirds (65%) had previously experienced intolerance to their cancer treatment regimen. Conclusion: Most patients surveyed expressed preference for the details of possible side effects they may encounter in their treatment. However, one in five considered such information a factor for nonadherence, indicating the need for patient-specific approaches when communicating medication risks.
SponsorUndergraduate Research Experience Program award (UREP 14-001-3-001) from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of Qatar Foundation).
Languageen
PublisherDove Press
Subjectrisk communication
Subjectcancer treatment
SubjectMiddle East
TitleMedication risk communication with cancer patients in a Middle East cancer care setting
TypeArticle
Pagination613-619
Volume Number10


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